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The Swedish right of common access

Due to the Swedish right of common access you may move freely throughout the countryside and use both established trails and the natural terrain of the mountains. This fantastic and unique law opens endless possibilities to our visitors but also comes with the responsibility of showing respect to both the environment and the owners of the land you walk through.

  • Everything you take with you must be taken home as well. Don’t leave any rubbish behind, not even in wind shelters or rubbish bins found within the ski system. They are emptied during the winter season, but not during the summer.
  • Light campfires responsibly and avoid lighting fires during dry periods. Use existing barbecue areas. Take fire wood with you and make sure your campfire is totally extinguished before moving on.
  • You may pick mushrooms, blueberries, lingonberries, cloudberries and other edible berries. Leave flowering plants alone unless you are sure what they are. There are several protected species in the region. Mt. Åreskutan is home to a number of species of rare and protected orchids, for example.
  • Do not disturb wild animals and keep dogs leashed so they cannot chase after reindeer or other animals. If you see young animals: Back away and wait until they move on.
  • Show respect to house and property owners by keeping away from their gardens and buildings. Do not use empty houses’ verandas as picnic areas. Use shelters marked on your map.
  • The area around Åreskutan is used by hunters in the autumn. The ptarmigan season starts in the last week of August and moose hunting starts on the first Monday in September. Pay attention to signs posted during this period to ensure not to disturb hunting. Select trails and areas which are not in hunting areas.

Main rule – do not disturb, do not destroy.

Read more about the Swedish Right of Public Access.

Last updated 5 October 2017

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