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Keep safe. Make smart decisions.

Niclas Vestefjell

Nice pow in the forest.

Anette Andersson

Read up and enjoy the ride.

Anette Andersson

Heads up for avalanches in Åre

Åre is not known for being a high-risk avalanche area, but it happens. Both spontaneous and ski-released avalanches occur inside and outside the mountains here. 
Read our vital tips.

Powder avalanche, loose snow avalanche, wet avalanche. We’d rather you not encounter any of them.

#1 Read up

Fjällsäkerhetsrådet has a good section on avalanche safety. Here you’ll find facts and films on how avalanche terrains are classed, how to measure the steepness of slopes, how to choose your routes, and what to do if an avalanche goes.

#2 Be equipped

A minimum amount of equipment is required to travel in avalanche terrain; knowledge, transceiver, shovel and collapsible avalanche probe.

#3 Educate yourself

It’s one thing to read to about it, but it’s another to practice it. Åre Lavincenter has shorter and longer courses with different levels throughout the winter season.

#4 Practice with equipment

If an accident were to occur, you’d like everything to be automated. When snow conditions are right, there is an avalanche search and rescue training course above Åre Lavinscenter’s office in Stjärnbacken.

#5 Retrieve information

On the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency website: lavinprognoser.se. You’ll find daily avalanche assessments and forecasts for Storulvån and Åre.

#6 Keep an eye on the Avalanche Danger Scale

All ski areas have daily avalanche indicators for areas outside the marked slopes of the ski system. Avalanche Danger Scale ranges from 1-5 (low to extreme probability) and may change during the day so it’s important to check the indicators on a regular basis.

#7 Ride with responsibility

Avalanche forecasts and avalanche reports give a hint of how the situation outside the slopes are. However, it’s your responsibility to make the decision to go or not. Make sure your decision is correct :-).

Last updated 1 February 2019

Categories

Alpine Skiing
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